If Ideas Had Shapes

A quoteblog ranging from philosophers in bathrobes to galaxy-rises

Tag: susan cain

Susan Cain – Quiet (2012)

We know from myths and fairy tales that there are many different kinds of powers in this world. One child is given a lightsaber, another a wizard’s education. The trick is not to amass all the different kinds of available power, but to use well the kind you’ve been granted.

Susan Cain – Quiet (2012)

We often marvel at how introverted, geeky kids “blossom” into secure and happy adults. We liken it to a metamorphosis. However, maybe it’s not the children who change but their environments.

Susan Cain – Quiet (2012)

Introverts talking to extroverts chose cheerier topics, reported making conversation more easily, and described conversing with extroverts as a “breath of fresh air.” In contrast, the extroverts felt that they could relax more with introvert partners and were freer to confide their problems. They didn’t feel pressure to be falsely upbeat.

…Extroverts need to know that introverts–who often seem to disdain the superficial–may be only too happy to be tugged along to a more lighthearted place; and introverts, who sometimes feel as if their propensity for problem talk makes them a drag, should know that they make it safe for others to get serious.

Susan Cain – Quiet (2012)

Being relatively unmotivated by rewards gives you the incalculable power to go your own way. It’s up to you to use that independence to good effect.

Susan Cain – Quiet (2012)

At the university level, introversion predicts academic performance better than cognitive ability.

Susan Cain – Quiet (2012)

…It’s also why exhortations to imagine the audience in the nude don’t help nervous speakers; naked lions are just as dangerous as elegantly dressed ones.

Susan Cain – Quiet (2012)

What’s so magical about solitude? In many fields, [Anders] Ericsson told me, it’s only when you’re alone that you can engage in Deliberate Practice, which he has identified as the key to exceptional achievement. When you practice deliberately, you identify the tasks or knowledge that are just out of your reach, strive to upgrade your performance, monitor your progress, and revise accordingly. Practice sessions that fall short of this standard are not only less useful — they’re counterproductive. They reinforce existing cognitive mechanisms instead of improving them.

Susan Cain – Quiet (2012)

A well-known study out of UC Berkeley by organizational behavior professor Philip Tetlock found that television pundits–that is, people who earn their livings by holding forth confidently on the basis of limited information–make worse predictions about political and economic trends than they would by random chance. And the very worst prognosticators tend to be the most famous and the most confident–the very ones who would be considered natural leaders in an HBS classroom.

Susan Cain – Quiet (2012)

But what do “sharp skills” look like? Should we become so proficient at self-presentation that we can dissemble without anyone suspecting? Must we learn to stage-manage our voices, gestures, and body language until we can tell–sell–any story we want? These seem venal aspirations, a marker of how far we’ve come–and not in a good way–since the days of Dale Carnegie’s childhood.

Susan Cain – Quiet (2012)

In the Culture of Character, the ideal self was serious, disciplined, and honorable. What counted was not so much the impression one made in public as how one behaved in private. The word personality didn’t exist in English until the eighteenth century, and the idea of “having a good personality” was not widespread until the twentieth.